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StageSource Annual Auditions Frequently Asked Questions
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How do I apply?

Complete the registration form (AEA or non-Equity) and make sure to follow the instructions. You can find registration forms and other information on our Audition Information page.  You must be a current PAID StageSource member in order to audition.  It takes the office one week to process a membership, so sign up well in advance of the audition application deadline.

I go to all the open calls, why should I do this too?

Some producers don't hold open calls, and some roles are often cast before an open call. The only way to be considered for these roles is for the producer to know your work and have you in their files. The StageSource annual auditions are an excellent opportunity to be seen by a large cross-section of Boston-area producers.

Will I get work from these auditions? When?

We hear from producers that, while they sometimes have cast people directly from this audition, more often they use this as a preliminary call and bring people in for callbacks later in the year, or even in future years. Even if they have seen you audition before, this is a great opportunity to show them another side to your work, or to refresh their memory.


What type of pieces should I prepare? 

Present your strongest material. Producers seem to prefer a contrast, in either two monologues or a monologue and a song. Depending on your strengths, that may mean classical/ contemporary, comedic/dramatic, or diverse characters.


How do I prepare my monologue(s)?

Memorize them, do your "actor work", and have someone else see them. If you can afford it, an audition coach is invaluable in giving insight and direction, as well as helping to find and choose material. Make sure to have someone else time you - the two-minute limit (three minutes for AEA) is strictly enforced.


What happens when I show up?

Please arrive 45 minutes before your scheduled half-hour block. You will come into the back entrance and check in with Performer Registration, who will collect your headshots and tell you when we will next need you. You will then have some time to relax and warm-up while we collate your headshots. Unfortunately you must remain quiet while you're indoors as people are auditioning very close by. You will be called together in a group and given some information about the procedures, and brought into the hallway. Our Stage Manager will check the pronunciation of your name and tell you about the set-up of the space, and then call you in one-by-one. You will be given a list of registered producers, and there will be a highlighted list posted on the wall showing who is in attendance that day.


Why do I need 45 pictures & resumes (30 for AEA)?

Based on previous years, we assume approximately 40-45 companies will register. We always ask for a few extra since we don't know exactly how many we will need until that day- producers can register in the morning when they arrive. If you don't have 45 headshots, you may miss getting one to that producer who thought you were fabulous, but now has no way to contact you!  We collect extras and returns and bring them back to our office. They will be available for you to collect the week after the auditions are over, and for one month afterwards. After that, resumes that remain uncollected will be discarded. You may also bring with you to the auditions a SASE stamped for $5.50 to cover the cost of mailing extra headshots and resumes back to you. Everyone has some headshots returned from producers who perhaps know that there is not a role for you in their season, or who already have you in their files, etc. Producers who registered but did not show up one day will get a set of headshots from that period. Please be sure that your headshots are securely attached to your resumes on all four corners.  


What producers usually attend the auditions?

Producers will register up until the day of the event.  The list changes every year.  


Why do I have a half-hour timeblock?

We used to give out an exact time (like 10:52), but few people ever went on in their exact time slot because of the logistics of 300 performers! The half-hour block sets a clearer expectation of when you will be auditioning. It's important to arrive 45 minutes early as we request, since we need time to collate headshots, and we may be running ahead of schedule.


Why do people who didn't audition last year get first priority?

To make sure that everyone has a fair shot to audition.


I've never done an audition before.  Should I do this as my first one?

These auditions might not be the best place to start out. In most auditions there are 2-3 auditors in the audience, and you have a chance to say hello to them. The StageSource auditions are a much higher pressure situation, with anywhere between 30-100 people in the room and no time to get to know them. We advise you to first go to some auditions that you see on our e-newsletters to get comfortable with auditioning, and come to these auditions next year.


I have a day job.  Do these producers rehearse at night?

Many do. However, there are some companies that rehearse during daytime hours and there are often casting directors present who are casting for commercials and other projects that require daytime work.


Can I see the space before I audition?

During the auditions the space is constantly in use and is not available to performers.

How much time do I have to audition?

Non-Equity performers have two minutesEquity performers have three minutes. This time limit is strictly enforced; at two minutes the Stage Manager will say "time", and you should then thank the auditors and exit the stage politely. We have over 300 performers, so it is essential that we enforce these limits. See below for information about announcing your pieces.


Am I Equity or non-Equity? What does that mean?

If you don't know, you are non-Equity. For more information on Equity see


Do I get a chance to announce my name and my pieces?

Yes, and it is encouraged. Producers like that few seconds to see you, instead of the character(s) you will be portraying. The Stage Manager will announce your name. You may then choose to state your name and the name(s) of your piece(s), and then the timer will start. However, if you choose to tell the auditors any more than that, the Stage Manager will start timing you.


What happens if I'm singing? Do I get to meet the accompanist?

If you indicate that you will be singing on your application, we will schedule you when our accompanist will be there. You will receive instructions about preparing your sheet music when you receive your time assignment. Unfortunately you will not have a chance to meet the accompanist on the day of the auditions. If you prefer, you may bring a cued, battery-operated tape-player or CD-player, however producers have told us that they prefer to see you sing with an accompanist. Of course the way to assure your best audition is to bring your own accompanist.

What if I need to cancel?

If you cancel at least a week ahead of time, your time slot will be given to someone else and it will not be damaging to you in any way. We encourage you to do so as soon as possible to give others sufficient time to prepare. However, if you confirm and do not show up, you will be last priority for the following year's auditions, no exceptions. Producers receive a list of scheduled performers which will include your name, even if you cancel within the last week.


What if I need to change my time?

We encourage you to talk to other StageSource members to swap times or, to forfeit your time slot and be put on the waitlist for the time you desire.  Being put on the waitlist does not guarantee you the time slot you are looking for and once you forfeit your assignment it is given to someone already on the waitlist.


updated February 24, 2016

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